Drug Crime Case Results

State of Minnesota v. P.T.S. (Hennepin County, 2017)

The State charged Client with possession of a controlled substance that could have resulted in a substantial amount of jail time and a felony conviction Through a relentless defense strategy we are able to prove that Client legally did not possess the controlled substance--either directly or constructively--to manifest a unlawful possession. As a result, the State DISMISSED all charges against Client..

State of Minnesota v. B.M.S. (Wright County, 2016)

The State charged Client with possession of a controlled substance that could have resulted in a substantial amount of jail time and a felony conviction that would haunt Client forever. This would have had a detrimental impact on virtually every area of Client's life. However, through an aggressive defense strategy we are able to prove that Client legally did not possess the controlled substance--either directly or constructively--to manifest a criminal act. As a result, the State DISMISSED all charges against Client. Justice truly was served.

State of Minnesota v. J.R.M. (Anoka County, 2016):

Law enforcement executed a search warrant on Client's residence based on a tip from an alleged confidential informant. Law enforcement uncovered thousands of grams of marijuana, marijuana-type substances, and evidence of sale. After vigorous negotiations with the State, the State agreed to DISMISS all charges against Client. Client can now move forward with the grips of a criminal conviction holding back the trajectory of his life!

State of Minnesota v. K.D.P. (Anoka County, 2016):

Law enforcement executed a search warrant on Client's residence suspecting that Client was engaged in a drug trafficking organization. Law enforcement monitored the packages sent through the mail to Client as well as the traffic and the unique characteristics of Client's residence. After executing the warrant, law enforcement found well over 50 alleged Ecstasy pills. After a host of constitutional challenges made to the warrants, the searches, and the veracity of the evidence, the State DISMISSED all charges against Client. Overturning every stone is paramount and resulted in the dismissal.

State of Minnesota v. M.P.H. (Ramsey County, 2015):

Law enforcement executed a search warrant on client's house suspecting a marijuana grow operation. In addition to the marijuana grow operation, law enforcement uncovered a host of loaded firearms and 102 grams of methamphetamine. Client was charged with a 1st degree drug possession charge and was facing a mandatory minimum sentence of 3 years in prison for possessing loaded firearms in the presence of drugs and a presumptive prison commitment of 86 months. Through vigorous advocacy for my client and the employment of aggressive treatment programming, we convinced the State to DISMISS the mandatory minimum sentence regarding the firearms and DEPART from the sentencing guidelines to a probationary sentence. Persistence was absolutely crucial!

State of Minnesota v. S.G & J.G. (Blue Earth County, 2014):

Clients were stopped for an equipment violation traveling from Colorado to Minnesota. After they were stopped, the police found marijuana (of all kinds) and a host of drug paraphernalia. Clients were charged with multiple felony drug crimes. Through intense negotiations, State agreed to DISMISS after proof that Clients possessed valid medical marijuana cards from Colorado.

United States of America v. M.N. (United States District Court for the District of Minnesota, 2013):

Client was charged with multiple counts of drug trafficking and drug sales in federal court. Client had prior drug convictions so Client's presumptive prison commit sentence was 12 years in federal prison. We worked hard to present Client in the best light before the federal sentencing judge. We argued that Client was only tangentially involved in the drug transactions and that his life history did not afford Client the ability to seek a life beyond crime. The judge accorded with our position and sentence Client to 5 years, as opposed to 12 years, in federal prison.